3-5, Elementary Music, Lessons

DIY Music Manipulative: Battleship

Funny story: Last year, I was working really hard to get my students to learn the notes of the treble clef. Towards the beginning of this adventure, I gave them all staves to look at, and bingo chips. I’d say, “Put a chip on line one. Put one on space four.” And on and on. In the middle of one of these, I thought that it sounded similar to the game battleship.

And I actually gasped and said, “We should play battleship!”

And all of my poor, board-game-deprived fourth graders looked at me like I had totally lost my mind.

Which is ok, by the way. If they think you are a little crazy, they are less likely to do something ridiculous in your room.

And so the brain-storming began.

Little did I know that other people had done this too… but I’m going to pretend I made it up. Because I did arrive at it independently, I promise.

Anyway, even though about two kids in each class had played battleship before, it was a lot of fun. It really helped them to learn the staff.

We also played it in centers, but if you do this, I suggest playing it all together first, so that you can explain to students what they are doing.

I also used this for assessment—I just walked around and watched them play. One person will say, “Do you have a battleship on A?” and the other will say yes or no, and you can see if they mark it on the right line/space.

I will also put the rules for how to play at the bottom, so that you can check it out!

If you need some help with using centers with crazy classes… check this post out.

 

DIY Music Manipulative: Battleship. This board game based teaching tool is great for upper elementary or middle school students who are learning about the treble clef. It can be adjusted for different lessons. My upper elementary music classes loved it! And it is super CHEAP. Becca's Music Room.

Musical Battleship

Materials:

 

Procedure:

  • Print out two treble clefs on the same sheet of paper. I downloaded this one from Teachers Pay Teachers (for free!). Then I printed two out, cut them, taped them to a clean sheet of paper, and copied them. I know that sounds like a lot, but it wasn’t! I added the words “yours” and “theirs” so that we understood the game a bit better.
  • Stuff treble clefs into sheet protectors (you could also laminate, but this was quicker, and you can put other things inside them if you wanted!).
  • Staple sheet protectors into the file folders. I just put two staples in the top. I tried to make it so that I can put other things inside of them.
  • That’s it!

Also read: Free 3-5 Music Lesson: Extra Beat, Take a Seat

DIY Music Manipulative: Battleship. This board game based teaching tool is great for upper elementary or middle school students who are learning about the treble clef. It can be adjusted for different lessons. My upper elementary music classes loved it! And it is super CHEAP. Becca's Music Room.

Rules of the Game:

  • Students pair up. Each person gets a battleship game. We used expo markers and drew on them, but you could also put bingo chips on the lines/spaces.
  • Each students makes three dots for on the staff marked “yours”. These are their battleships.
  • Students take turns asking where the other student’s battleships are. It should sound like this:
  • “Is there one on B?” (You could also do second line, third space, etc. depending on what you are teaching them.)
  • “Hit” if they hit and “miss” if they miss it.
  • The students mark their guesses. If they guess correctly, on the staff marked “theirs”, they put a dot. That way they know there is a battleship there. If they miss, they put an x. Make sure they do this, otherwise they will ask the same place ten times.

That’s it! I played this with 3-5 grades. At first they really did not get it, but they slowly started to comprehend as time went on. And they LOVED it!

Also read: Lesson Ideas: Creative Movement with Scarves

What are your favorite DIY music manipulatives? Let us know in the comments!

Happy teaching!

DIY Music Manipulative: Battleship. This board game based teaching tool is great for upper elementary or middle school students who are learning about the treble clef. It can be adjusted for different lessons. My upper elementary music classes loved it! And it is super CHEAP. Becca's Music Room.

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Differentiation, Elementary Music

Easy-Peasy Differentiation in the Music Room

Differentiation. Woo that is a scary word… especially if you teach elementary music. We tend to sit through lectures and professional developments about differentiation and shudder in despair.

I can’t do that, we think. This doesn’t apply to me.

Well…. Yes and no.

Now, some lessons really don’t lend themselves to differentiation. Some do. And when you think about it, you already do differentiation. Even when you don’t realize it.

Here are some easy-peasy differentiation ideas. Some of them are things you already do, just need to be more aware of them. When you are aware of them, you can make sure to point them out (to the kids and administrators!). Others will take more effort, but none of these ideas are difficult or time consuming.

Also read: Music Centers Classroom Management for “Bad Classes”

Easy-Peasy Differentiation in the Music Room: Think you can't differentiate because you teach music? Think differentiation is only ok in centers? Think again! Here are some RIDICULOUSLY easy ideas to differentiate in your class-- that you may already be doing! Becca's Music Room



Dances

This is an example of differentiation that you already do. If you use any kind of dances or movement activities, you use differentiation.

Naturally, when preforming dances, students who are struggling will do less and students who are doing a good job will start to add more to their moves. Think about it—if the child is struggling to do movements while walking in a circle, they are naturally going to just walk instead. That is automatic differentiation.

Now that you know that is differentiation, you can use it consciously!

When I teach students a new dance, I tell them ways they can make it easier or harder. Like if we are walking in a circle doing a dance, then I’ll tell them to make sure to do the walking and not worry about the rest.

If students are doing a good job, I’ll ask them to push it harder—how can you make this movement look like the music? What could you add to make it better?

Easy-peasy.

You can also observe them throughout the class and put them into teired groups either for part of the class or for the next class. You can give them different ways to do the dance, and they can perform it for the other groups. Have each group add extra movements, but change the difficulty of each of the dances. This way they will each look different– without them knowing that some groups are more advanced than others.

Also read: Boomwhackers and Science Lesson



 

Instruments

There are two different types of instrument lessons. There are instruments to accompany songs or books. Then there is recorder karate or rainbow ukulele.

As for the first type of lesson, there are ways to make it different. If a student is struggling with a rhythm, you can have them just play the downbeat, or you can put them onto a different instrument that may be easier.

You don’t even have to sort them– you can just say, “OK guys, if that’s too hard, then try playing the steady beat on mi and sol. If you think this is too easy, then try playing this rhythm on different notes.”

To tier it up, you can have them sing the song while playing the instrument. You could have them make up their own accompaniment. If you want everyone to play the c-e-g-c on the quarter notes, you could have more advanced students play different rhythms one the same notes.

Recorder karate is literally made for differentiation– students who understand more quickly move quickly.


Easy-Peasy Differentiation in the Music Room: Think you can't differentiate because you teach music? Think differentiation is only ok in centers? Think again! Here are some RIDICULOUSLY easy ideas to differentiate in your class-- that you may already be doing! Becca's Music Room

Singing

Singing may seem like it is hard to differentiate, but it is not.

How do I tier a song down to make it easier? Easy. When teaching, you can break it down with solfege and rhythmic notation. When singing, you can have students sing on “loo” instead of with the words. This is helpful, especially if the song is in another language. (These are all things you can do in your whole group lessons!)

To make songs harder, you can add dynamics or phrasing. Ask students to make up movements to go along with the song. You can do the song as a round, and allow students who are excelling fend for themselves while aiding the other group.

Also read: Blue Skies Jazz  Lesson

 

Centers

Now this is a form of differentiation that you have heard of before.

But good news—you can use this is the music room.

Here are two easy ways to differentiate with centers:

  1. Flashcards: There are lots of centers activities including flashcards—singing the solfege on them, reading rhythms, performing rhythms, etc. You can use two sets of them—or three or four. You could have students play rhythms on one note of an instrument, and to tier up you could play the same rhythm on different notes. (Check out some rhythm flashcards here)
  2. Working with students: When I do centers (and how they advise to do them in professional development meetings), I always have one center that is an activity with me. Sometimes we practice writing rhythms or melodies, identifying notes on the staff, composing rhythms, etc. Sometimes the students really don’t need me, but I station myself there anyway. These are ridiculously easy to differentiate, and allows you to see more easily who understands the concepts.



Easy-peasy, right?

How many are you already doing?

Probably all of them.

Anyway, those are some really easy ways to differentiate. Most of them are already being done, but when you realize that, you can point them out to students and write it into your lesson plans to help emphasize that you are doing those things.

This year, I plan to dive deeper into differentiation (which, of course, also includes better assessment… yuck…), so look subscribe for more posts about differentiation and other music teaching stuff.

How do you differentiate in your music class? Do you find it easy or difficult? Let me know in the comments!

Happy teaching!



Easy-Peasy Differentiation in the Music Room: Think you can't differentiate because you teach music? Think differentiation is only ok in centers? Think again! Here are some RIDICULOUSLY easy ideas to differentiate in your class-- that you may already be doing! Becca's Music Room



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3-5, Elementary Music, Lessons

Free 3-5 Music Lesson: Extra Beat, Take a Seat

This is one of my favorite games! I learned it from my mentor during student teaching. I am not sure where she got it from. I haven’t seen it in any books or on the internet. If you know where Extra Beat Take a Seat comes from, feel free to let me know so I can give credit where credit is due!

I have also used it during a long term substitute job, and the first week of school during my first year.

It is easy to figure it out, musical, and fun.

It is also good if you need to travel to classrooms. I have used it many times for that. Just do it with hands instead of rhythm sticks.

Also read: Free 3-5 Music Lesson: Boomwhackers and Science

Free 3-5 Music Lesson: Extra Beat Take a Seat. A really fun rhythm game for upper elementary. Can be played with rhythm sticks, drums, or no materials at all! Becca's Music Room



Extra Beat, Take a Seat

Focus:

I can count rhythm patterns.

Materials:

Also read: Phrases for Classroom Management in the Music Room

Free 3-5 Music Lesson: Extra Beat Take a Seat. A really fun rhythm game for upper elementary. Can be played with rhythm sticks, drums, or no materials at all! Becca's Music Room



Procedure:

  • Have students sit on a circle on the floor.
  • Start by having students play a short rhythm on repeat. I like to use quarter note, quarter note, half note. I play the first two with rhythm sticks on the floor, and the last note tap together. This, by the ways, is the “We Will Rock You” rhythm, so get ready to hear someone sing that.
  • Once they have the rhythm down, tell them to put their sticks down and listen. Tell them you are going to play the rhythm three times and three times only. And then do it. Count out loud so that they can hear what you mean.
  • Have them play it with you, three times and three times only. Someone will keep going—use that as an example.

Also read: Free K-2 Music Lesson: Sempre Libera Scarf Routine

Free 3-5 Music Lesson: Extra Beat Take a Seat. A really fun rhythm game for upper elementary. Can be played with rhythm sticks, drums, or no materials at all! Becca's Music Room
Here are the rhythms in notation. D for playing on the floor, and u for playing sticks together.



  • Tell them that you are going to play a game. They have to play the rhythm first three times and three times only. If they make an extra beat, they have to take a seat (sit in the middle of the circle). Then the class will try it again. Once the whole class (or whoever is left!) gets it right, then the round is over and everyone can rejoin the circle.
  • Once students get three times down, the round is over. The next time everyone will play the rhythm five times. Keep moving up by two each time. I usually go to eleven, and then find a new rhythm. You can do that or choose something else.
  • Once they get to whatever your magic number is, get a new rhythm.
  • My second rhythm is quarter note, quarter note, two eighth notes, quarter note. Play the rhythms as down-down-up-up-up. Again, if you make an extra beat, then you take a seat.
  • The third rhythm that I use is eighth notes, eighth notes, quarter note, quarter note, quarter note. this one goes down-down-up-up-down-up-down

A few tips:

Use a djembe to play the rhythms, because students can hear it over their sticks. This will help them keep the beat study.

You can play this without the sticks—just have students tap their legs and clap. This makes it great for the classroom.

You can add in some simple math practice by asking questions like, “If I have three notes and I play it three times, how many notes do I play total?”

Also read: Music Lesson Ideas: Opera Stories

So there you go! It’s not too difficult, but it is very fun! What is your favorite rhythm game? Let us know in the comments!

Free 3-5 Music Lesson: Extra Beat Take a Seat. A really fun rhythm game for upper elementary. Can be played with rhythm sticks, drums, or no materials at all! Becca's Music Room



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3-5, Elementary Music, Lessons

Free 3-5 Music Lesson: Boomwhackers and Science

Boomwhackers. I love Boomwhackers. I love to use them for everything, really. Rhythms, chords, etc.

This is a super simple, mini science lesson that I like to use with Boomwhackers.

In Georgia at least, they talk about the science of sound in 1st grade and 4th grade. I have used parts of this with all of my grades to help reinforce some science. This lesson is better suited for older students though.

Free 3-5 Music Lesson: Boomwhackers and Science. Great lesson for third grade, fourth grade, and fifth grade. Students read rhythms, talk about high and low sounds, and learn how size affects sound. Becca's Music Room.



Boomwhackers and Science

Materials:

Boomwhackers in a Pentatonic scale (click here to check them out)

Hula hoops

Rhythm cards

Baton (optional)

Free 3-5 Music Lesson: Boomwhackers and Science. Great lesson for third grade, fourth grade, and fifth grade. Students read rhythms, talk about high and low sounds, and learn how size affects sound. Becca's Music Room.



Procedures:

  • Start by introducing the Boomwhackers, and going over the rules.
  • Show them two Boomwhackers that are the same note but different octaves. I like to use C because I have them in three octaves, so I can use my really big one and really small one.
  • Repeat after me: Small is high, big is low, that is science you should know!
  • Say that a few times and then ask which one of the boomwhackers is going to be higher just by looking at it. I like to have them point either right or left so that I can see what they think. Then play them so the kids can hear if they are correct.

Also read: Phrases for Classroom Management in the Music Room



  • Pass out the Boomwhackers.
  • Have the students get into groups, one with each of the Boomwhackers and have them arrange themselves lowest to highest (this works better if your kids haven’t figured out that the letters are on the Boomwhackers. And yes, mine usually don’t notice.) Then have them play a rhythm in that order so that you can hear it going up the scale.
  • Have students sit with all their colored Boomwhackers at a hula hoop. Put a rhythm (I just use my normal rhythm cards) inside of the hula hoop. Give them thirty seconds to practice the rhythm (I always walk around and double check that they are all playing them correct).
  • Do whatever your attention-getting system is. I use a cow bell because it is louder than thirty Boomwhackers.
  • You are the conductor. Walk to each of the groups and have them play their rhythm on repeat. Bring in each of the other groups until everyone is playing. I like to add in crescendos and decrescendos after everyone is playing.
  • After everyone has come in, go through and stop each of the groups.
  • Assessment time: Have students take a good look at the Boomwhacker they have. After rotating to a new instrument, have them hold it above their head if it is higher than the old one or close to the group if it is lower—just by sight.
  • Bonus: Have a student “conduct” the Boomwhacker choir!
  • Extension: Show them two other similar instruments and have them guess which one is higher. I like to bring in my violin and cello, but it could work with a guitar and an ukulele or a flute and a piccolo, or whatever you have available.

Also read: Music Lesson Ideas: Opera



Free 3-5 Music Lesson: Boomwhackers and Science. Great lesson for third grade, fourth grade, and fifth grade. Students read rhythms, talk about high and low sounds, and learn how size affects sound. Becca's Music Room.
This is a fourth grade playing Boomwhackers along with In the Hall of the Mountain King. Video from YouTube.

So there you go! It’s not too hard, but it does really help solidify their understanding of how size relates to sound. You can also show them pictures of the whole string family, or a close up of strings on a guitar or ukulele or violin and show them how even the thickness of the strings affects how high or low they are.

If you don’t have and Boomwhackers, get them! Click on the picture below.

Also read: Free Music Lesson: Bizet Scarf Routine

Do you talk about science in music? What is your favorite way to do that? Let us know in the comments!

 



Free 3-5 Music Lesson: Boomwhackers and Science. Great lesson for third grade, fourth grade, and fifth grade. Students read rhythms, talk about high and low sounds, and learn how size affects sound. Becca's Music Room.

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3-5, Elementary Music, K-2, Lessons

Music Lesson Ideas: Opera Stories

If you have been reading my blog, then you have hear me mention that my Kindergarten, 1st, and 2nd graders spent a lot of time this year on opera. We use the Musical Explorer curriculum (currently available in Savannah and New York City, and I heard rumors that they are trying to get it elsewhere). Every semester, students learn about three styles of music, and then they go to a concert. This means that by the time they finish, they have gone to 6 concerts and learn 18 styles of music.

Which is awesome!

I really cannot sing its praises enough.

Anyway… this semester was Ringshout, Opera, and Blues.

And we spent a lot of time on opera.

You can read about our Creative Movement with Scarves lesson here, or our Bizet Scarf Routine here. (Do you see a theme? I truly love scarves in the music room!)

You can click on the picture to buy some for your music room!

This lesson is all about the opera stories.

Now, opera stories can be a little bit on the ridiculous side. Some of them are reeeeally complicated (Can you say Magic Flute?). Or inappropriate (Can you say Carmen?). This made teaching the opera stories really complicated.

So here are a few ideas to help out…



Music Lesson Ideas: Opera Stories. Lots of ideas for teaching opera in elementary music! Scarves, videos, books, writing, coloring, etc. I used lots of these in my classroom, and now my students love opera! Success! Becca's Music Room

Tell the Story Around the Aria

The two piece the students were supposed to learn were from Norma and La Traviata.

Have you ever tried explaining either of those to Kindergarteners? It’s difficult.

Instead, I just told them the story right around the aria. I basically just explained what they were saying.

For example, with La Traviata, instead of trying to explain the whole thing in its ridiculousness, I just talked about the aria.

We watched this video. First, I told them to try to decide how she was feeling by her facial expressions. I stopped it every once and a while and ask. I like this video because she looks happy while she sings, and then upset when the man is singing.

Afterward, I told them what was going on—that she is talking about wanting to be free, so she is happy. The man wants her to marry him, but she does not want to marry him. This is why she looks upset when he is singing.

And that is all they really needed to know about that.

First story down!



Pick a Beginning, Middle, and End

The next of the opera stories we learned was The Magic Flute. Now, the Magic Flute is another one of those operas that is just kind of all over the place. It is complicated, and there are a ton of things going on.

I did something terrible—I only told them about the first act.

The first and second acts are just so different that it was too difficult to try to get it all in there.

We watched this video of the Papageno/Pagagena duet. They thought that it was HILARIOUS. They laughed so hard at the part where they were singing “Pa… pa pa….. pa… pa pa…” I got a wonderful video on my Instagram of some of my first graders singing along with it.

Then we talked about how all stories have a beginning, middle, and end. In this one, the beginning is when Princess Pamina gets captured. In the middle, Papageno and the Prince Tamino go and look for her. At the end, they find her!

Yes, I know. Only one act and extremely simplified. But that’s what Kindergarteners need.

After the video and the discussion, we did this coloring sheet which I got for free on Crayola’s website. I cut them out ahead of time (you can have the kids do it if you are feeling adventurous), and we drew pictures of the beginning, middle, and end. The boxes are pretty small, so I did have the older kids write “beginning, middle, and end”, but I did not have them write what was happening.

You can get the coloring page here.

If you want a writing connection, you could give them a piece of paper and have them write a sentence or two for each part.

My main focus was “Opera is fun!” rather than “We need to know exactly how The Magic Flute goes.”



Compare and Contrast

Pick an opera that has a common story, like Cinderella. Talk to the students about what an opera is (People acting out a story by singing all the time). Then tell them sometimes when a composer writes an opera, they use a story people know.

Watch a video from the opera Cinderella. Then watch a video from the Disney movie Cinderella.

Make a Compare/Contrast chart. You could do it on the board, or have them do it individually or as groups.

Depending on the videos you pick, they will say different things. I would focus on differences like setting—opera is live, so the setting cannot change as much as a cartoon. Vocal quality—they will probably say the opera sounds “bigger” or “louder”.

Also read Free K-2 Music Lesson: Animal Form

Read a Book

We did not do this one, but it is probably the best option.

Read a book about an opera, or with the same story. Here are some examples with The Magic Flute.

After you read the book, watch a few videos from the opera.

Extension: Have them act it out! You can read the book, or have a student read it, and have the characters move around to act out the story. You can pause and listen to the arias as they come up in the story. (This would be great for older kids.)

You can click on these books to check them out.

Watch a Video

I was flipping through the channels one day and hear the music from Carmen. I stopped, and realized that it was an episode of Arthur!

In this 15 min. video, Muffy and her dad are going to the opera. She thinks that she won’t like it, but after she tries it, she does.

The great thing is they use real music! There is one scene where they change the plot to make it kid-friendly and have the characters singing in English. At the end, they are snippets of the real music from Carmen.

We watched it and the kids loved it! And since it is shorter, it didn’t take up too much of the time.

Check it out here.


And a Bulletin Board Idea….

For this month, I did an opera bulletin board. I made three of the coloring sheets with the school’s poster maker (in other words, I didn’t spend any money). I wrote the sentence that corresponds with the beginning, middle, and end. Then I put it up along with some of the kid’s drawings. the drawings are form the Crayola website which is above under “Beginning, Middle, and End”.

I added the title and the answer to the question “What is opera?”. And I wrote that we were doing The Magic Flute.

Music Lesson Ideas: Opera Stories. Lots of ideas for teaching opera in elementary music! Scarves, videos, books, writing, coloring, etc. I used lots of these in my classroom, and now my students love opera! Success! Plus a bulletin board idea. Becca's Music Room Music Lesson Ideas: Opera Stories. Lots of ideas for teaching opera in elementary music! Scarves, videos, books, writing, coloring, etc. I used lots of these in my classroom, and now my students love opera! Success! Plus a bulletin board idea. Becca's Music Room

How did it turn out?

Great!

My opera lessons were huge hits.

When we watched the Arthur video, I told them “Some people think that opera is boring, and they don’t like it!”

You should have seen their shocked little faces. They gasped and said “No!”

I said, “Yes. Do you think opera is boring?”

“No! Opera is fun!”

This is a big deal in any school, but in my urban, inner city school, it was an even bigger deal.

What opera strategies do you use? Do your kids keep an open mind? Let me know in the comments!

Music Lesson Ideas: Opera Stories. Lots of ideas for teaching opera in elementary music! Scarves, videos, books, writing, coloring, etc. I used lots of these in my classroom, and now my students love opera! Success! Plus a bulletin board idea. Becca's Music Room



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3-5, Elementary Music, K-2, Lessons

Lesson Ideas: Creative Movement with Scarves

I love using scarves in my classroom. We do scarf routines that I have made up, or from Artie Almeida’s Parachutes and Ribbons and Scarves, Oh My! (Which if you do not have, you need!). We use them to keep the steady beat, feel phrases, etc.

So when I first started my opera unit, I thought, “I will make up a scarf routine for these two songs.”

And then I didn’t.

So it was right before my first class, and I realized that I had forgotten. So I decided to improvise.

“Let’s do creative movement with scarves! You can make up your own moves that match the music.”

I thought creative movement would be a disaster. That people would be hitting each other or bored or whatever.

But they loved it.

See some of my other favorite resources in my Resources Page.

Lesson Ideas: Creative Movement with Scarves. Learn how to use creative movement and scarves to teach high/low, melody, listening, form, and even assessment! Scarves are the greatest tool there is in elementary music. Becca's Music Room

I know this is nothing new, but I am here to say if you have not tried creative movement, you should. How do I incorporate creative movement? You may ask. Well here are some ideas…

Creative Movement for Listening

This is the easiest and best. This is how I used creative movement for the first time.

We were learning about opera. My school district does this wonderful program called Musical Explorers. The students learn about three types of music, and then go to a concert… twice a year. If you teach in near Savannah, Georgia or New York City, check it out! (Link for Savannah, link for NYC)

Anyway, one of our styles is opera. I love opera, so I was very excited for this.

We had some quiet listening time first. I told them to close their eyes. They could move their arms or heads or bodies, but eyes have to stay closed and you have to stay in your seat.

This also went better than anticipated.

Then we talked about opera. We watched a video of the other song we needed to learn. Then I pulled out the scarves.

All I said was that your scarf should match the music. So if it is fast, how should your scarf move? If it is slow, how should your scarf move? With the older kids, we talked about how you could also trace the melody, or have bigger movements when it was louder.

And it was great! Most of them actually bought into it and were listening.

Tips: Let them hear the music prior to turning them loose with the scarves. Encourage them to move their body to the music so that it will be easy to translate to the scarves.

Lesson Ideas: Creative Movement with Scarves. Learn how to use creative movement and scarves to teach high/low, melody, listening, form, and even assessment! Scarves are the greatest tool there is in elementary music. Becca's Music Room

Creative Movement for High and Low

My students have practiced high and low while moving around the room, wiggling their fingers, pretending to be fairies and monsters, etc. Scarves would be great!

You could play on the piano and have them move their scarf high for high sounds or low for low sounds. The Music Connection has a recording of high and low sounds for this purpose. Have them talk about different high movements and low movements. Challenge them by having them pick a different movement each time.

My students listened to Edward Elgar’s Fairies and Giants. We pretended to be fairies on our tip toes for the high parts and crouched down low for loud parts. You could have a lot of fun moving the scarves with this one.

Also: Free K-2 Music Lesson: Rhythm

Creative Movement for Piano and Forte

This is along the same lines. Play an instrument or listen to a piece that has forte and piano sections. Have students pick a movement to represent each one (maybe something with a small movement for piano and a large movement for forte).

You could also divide the room into two and have students move to one side for piano and the other for forte, while creatively moving their scarves to the music.

Of course, you would want to break that into sections—first listen, then stay in seats and show forte and piano, then move around the room for each one, and then finally do it all together with the scarves.

Lesson Ideas: Creative Movement with Scarves. Learn how to use creative movement and scarves to teach high/low, melody, listening, form, and even assessment! Scarves are the greatest tool there is in elementary music. Becca's Music Room
Second graders closing their eyes so they can “feel the music” in their scarves while listening to the music from Norma.

Creative Movement for Form

Have students listen to a piece of music with clear distinctions between sections (I like March from The Nutcracker (ABACABA), Rondo Alla Turca (ABCBABC), and Ballet of the Unhatched Chicks (AABA)) and talk about how form is how music is made. Talk about the form of it, so they know (and write it on the board). Then have students make up a movement for each section with their scarves.

You could even start this way, and then have students vote for their favorite movements to create a routine!

Check out my Animal Form lesson here.

Creative Movement for Moods

Have students listen to (short) pieces of music and use their scarf to reflect it. They can also use their faces to express how the music feels. Tell them they can move the scarf however they want as long as they are listening—if it is a slow, quiet piece, then the scarf movement should reflect that.

Also—end with a slow, calm, quiet piece as a winding down activity.

Artie Almeida has a great music-mood resource which you can use with scarves.

Creative Movement for Assessment

Yes, you heard me: assessment.

Creative movement with scarves can be used for assessing any of the things I mentioned and then some. Just watch the students responding to the music, and write down if they are understanding or not. For assessment purposes, having them close their eyes will give you a better sense of what they know.

Some other things you could assess include:

  • Instruments of the orchestra: Pick a movement for each instrument family, and have students watch or listen to a piece and show what they see. The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra would be great for this.
  • Melody: Have students listen to a song and trace the melody with their scarves.
  • Crescendos and decrescendos: Moving in increasingly large circles for crescendos and small circles for decrescendos.

Those are some ideas. Did I miss something that you like to do with creative movement? Have you tried any of these before? Let us know in the comments! I am always open to more ideas!

And don’t forget to get your scarves! If you do not believe me, try it and see! School can’t afford scarves? Check out my article on Donor’s Choose. You may be able to get them for free! 

Lesson Ideas: Creative Movement with Scarves. Learn how to use creative movement and scarves to teach high/low, melody, listening, form, and even assessment! Scarves are the greatest tool there is in elementary music. Becca's Music Room


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Elementary Music, K-2, Lessons

Free K-2 Music Lesson: Animal Form

This may sound strange, but form is my favorite thing to teach students in my elementary music room. There are so many ways that you can teach it—through movement, drawing, manipulatives, etc. My favorite of the these is definitely movement.

This is a lesson that I did during my student teaching last year. It was one of three of my “focus lessons”.

We learned about form in many different ways: manipulatives, coloring, and flashlight routines (which are the bomb!), and with instruments. This lesson is with manipulatives and movement.

Also check out: Free K-2 Music Lesson: Rhythm

Click here for the FREE printable version Animal Form Lesson Plan

FREE Printable K-2 Music Lesson: Animal Form. Teach students about form using classical music listening, manipulatives, and movement! All of my favorite things. Featuring Ballet of the Unhatched Chicks by Mussorgsky and March from The Nutcracker by Tchaikovesky. Kindergarten, first, and second grade all loved this lesson! Becca's Music Room

Animal Form Lesson

Materials:

 

Standards:

6. We compose music.

7. We listen to music.

10. We move to music.

Also: Traveling Music Teacher: What to Do When Not in Your Room

Warm up:

  1. First, the teacher plays djembe or other drum. When the teacher plays forte, or loud (I would used the music vocabulary with 1 and 2 but not K) students will jump. When the teacher plays piano, or soft, students tip toe.
  2. Teacher plays 8 beats piano, then 8 beats forte. After they get a feel for that, feel free to speed up and slow down at will, or switch to 16 beats. This helps them get the hang of different sections, preparing them for form.

FREE Printable K-2 Music Lesson: Animal Form. Teach students about form using classical music listening, manipulatives, and movement! All of my favorite things. Featuring Ballet of the Unhatched Chicks by Mussorgsky and March from The Nutcracker by Tchaikovesky. Kindergarten, first, and second grade all loved this lesson! Becca's Music Room

Procedure:

  1. Give students the manipulatives. These can be whatever you have, but I will use the animal names that I used. Have them hold a chicken and an elephant behind their back. Listen to Ballet of the Unhatched Chicks. Have the chicken dance around during the A section and go behind your back at the end. The chicken will come back out for the repeat of A. Then the elephant for B. Then the chicken.
  2. Tell students that the animals represent different parts of the music. When we talk about form, we use letters instead of animal names. We will call the chicken A and the elephant B. this song went AABA. Can you make that pattern with your animals? (It helps if you put magnets on a few of yours so you can attach them to the board. Or you can put them in the pocket chart.)
  3. Have students decide on an action for each section. I had sentence strips with words like “tap head” or “snap” on them. Once they pick an action, I put the sentence strips and the manipulatives next to each other for reference.
  4. Listen to the piece again using the actions for each section.
  5. Have students make their own form with their animals (I added in the whales for the C section). Pick one of the students’ forms and have everyone copy it. Play three noises on the drum (I used forte, piano, and rolling)—one for each section. You could also use three different instruments. Play 8 beats for each of the “sections” of the song the kid put together and have them do the actions.
  6. Repeat as time permits.FREE Printable K-2 Music Lesson: Animal Form. Teach students about form using classical music listening, manipulatives, and movement! All of my favorite things. Featuring Ballet of the Unhatched Chicks by Mussorgsky and March from The Nutcracker by Tchaikovesky. Kindergarten, first, and second grade all loved this lesson! Becca's Music Room
  7. For more advanced groups, I had them each perform do their own form at the same time. Each section got eight beats, and I would play the first beat forte so they would know when to change their actions. It was really cool because they were all doing different actions but at the same time.
  8. Tell the students you get to pick the next one. Make it ABACABA for March from the Nutcracker.
  9. Practice the movements with 8 beats for each section while playing on drum or other instrument.
  10. Then, listen to the piece and do the movements with it.
  11. Have the students go back to AABA and listen to the first piece. You could do movements or have them hold the correct manipulative for each section. Do one with the students, then see who can do it with their eyes closed (if you need an assessment, you could mark down who is changing their movements at the right time).

FREE Printable K-2 Music Lesson: Animal Form. Teach students about form using classical music listening, manipulatives, and movement! All of my favorite things. Featuring Ballet of the Unhatched Chicks by Mussorgsky and March from The Nutcracker by Tchaikovesky. Kindergarten, first, and second grade all loved this lesson! Becca's Music Room

Make sure to add form to the word wall!

My kids had a blast! It also ties into the standards for math (at least in Georgia), because students have to make and recognize patterns.

What is your favorite way to teach form? Are you interested in the other lessons form this unit? Let me know in the comments!


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