Elementary Music, Folk songs, K-2, Lessons

2 4 6 8 Meet Me at the Garden Gate Clapping Game for Music

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Looking for a fun Spring chant to get kids moving AND practice quarter and eighth notes? 2, 4, 6, 8, Meet Me at the Garden Gate is the perfect song to get you through the Spring season. It includes a hand clapping game (I’ll share two versions), and is perfect for teaching ta and titi. 

I use this one with kindergarten and first grade, and sometimes pull it out as a warm up in second grade. 

If you want to make this lesson better (and easier!) you can purchase the lesson pack from my TPT shop. It includes slides, printables, and a garden themed composition activity to learn the chant, rhythm, clapping game, and more.

Click here to purchase!

After you teach quarter and eighth notes, pair this with the free flower rhythm craft– a fun way to create rhythmic compositions. Laminate and use for centers or small groups (students cana make up their own patterns, then play on instruments), or have students cut and glue onto a paper for a craft. 

It comes with tons of rhythms, so you can use it with every grade level. 

Click here to download free and get instant access!

2 4 6 8 Meet Me at the Garden Gate Chant

Rhythm slides for 2 4 6 8 Meet Me at the Garden Gate is a fun clapping game that will help your kindergarten and first grade elementary music students learn all about beat and rhythm. This is the perfect lesson for Spring music lessons, and it can be used to practice reading quarter and eighth notes. Blog post from Becca's Music Room

As you can see, this chant is the perfect folk song for Spring music lessons in kindergarten and first grade. Students can learn about and practice steady beat, beat v. rhythm, introduce rhythm, or even quarter and eighth notes.

2, 4, 6, 8 Hand Clapping Game

The original clapping activity is to have students tap their legs, then partner’s hands to the beat. We usually start with that one, then move onto a harder pattern.

  • Line 1: Pat legs, the partner’s hands to the beat
  • Line 2: Clap the rhythm
  • Line 3: Walk in circle around partner
  • Line 4: Pat legs, the partner’s hands to the beat

We do this quite a few times– I’ll do it once or twice, then the kids will find a new partner to practice with. This keeps it fresh and if someone doesn’t get their favorite person the first time, they have other opportunities for more partners. 

2, 4, 6, 8 for Rhythm

We also use this chant to present or practice rhythm! Here’s the breakdown of that lesson (spread over a few days):

  • First, introduce the clapping game. Start by having students tap their legs and their hands. Then have them find a partner. Then you can make it harder by adding the other pieces.
  • After a few rounds, have students practice on their own again. Ask: What did we do with our hands? (We did the beat!)
  • Put heart icons on the board to represent the beat, or have students use a heartbeat chart (both included in the lesson pack) and have students tap the beat while they say the chant.

  • Next, put a chart with icons to represent the rhythm on the board. The lesson pack has 2 flowers to represent eighth notes and one bird to represent quarter notes. Have students tap the icons to show the rhythm.
  • Ask: Was that the beat? (no!) What was it? (depending on how far they are, you may get rhythm or the way the words go.)
  • Say: These icons show us the rhythm. The rhythm is the way that the words go, so it matches the beat but not the words. 

  • Ask: How many sounds does bird have? (one) How many sounds does flower have? (two)
  • Say: In music, we have some rhythms with one sounds and some with two. We call the one sound ta, and it looks like this (show quarter note). We call the two sounds titi and it looks like this (show eighth notes). 
  • Put some rhythms on the board, and echo the rhythms with the students. Then ask if anyone could guess the rhythms on the board. 

Rhythm slides for 2 4 6 8 Meet Me at the Garden Gate is a fun clapping game that will help your kindergarten and first grade elementary music students learn all about beat and rhythm. This is the perfect lesson for Spring music lessons, and it can be used to practice reading quarter and eighth notes. Blog post from Becca's Music Room

  • Then, you can make some rhythms! Use the garden rhythm manipulatives to show make rhythmic patterns with different vegetables. Do this together, then you can do it in partners or individually. 
  • Finish up with a worksheet sharing their learning– filling in the rhythm or do a color by note to color in a garden based on the rhythms in the garden!

Extensions for 2 4 6 8 Meet Me at the Garden Gate

Bee Bee Bumblebee

What lives in the garden? Bees! Use this chant and game to reinforce ta and titi and have some fun with the game.

This is an “out” game, where someone is the bee, they tap the beat on each person, and the last person is out.

Spring Rhythm Play Along

This is available on Youtube, and the kids love it! When they play the rhythms correctly, the flowers appear. They love guessing the next color!

Flower rhythm composition

Have fun in music class with this free flower rhythm centers activity for spring! Use as a craft, music bulletin board, or centers lesson for rhythm. Perfect for teaching during testing, in the teachers' classrooms, or around spring break. Free music lesson from Becca's Music Room

Create your own rhythm flower garden with these (free!) flower rhythm crafts. Laminate and use for centers or small groups (students can make up their own patterns, then play on instruments), or have students cut and glue onto a paper for a craft. 

It comes with tons of rhythms, so you can use it with every grade level. 

Click here to download free and get instant access!

So there’s 2 4 6 8 Meet Me at the Garden Gate! Your kindergarten and first grade elementary music students will love this one.

Don’t forget to make it easy on yourself and buy the lesson pack— slides, printables, and manipulatives included!

Click here to purchase!

Happy teaching! 

Becca

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